Plants of
South Australia
Calandrinia sphaerophylla
Portulacaceae
Bead Purslane
Display all 14 images
Distribution by Herbarium region
Adelaide
Arkaroola
Ceduna
Coober Pedy
Hawker
Innamincka
Marla
Marree
Mount Gambier
Oodnadatta
Renmark
Wudinna
Keith
Yunta

Botanical art

Kath Alcock painting: 1.

Etymology

Calandrinia named after Jean-Louis Calandrini (1703-1758), a Swiss scientist, professor of mathematics and philosophy. Sphaerophylla from the Greek 'sphaira' meaning a ball and 'phylla' meaning a leaf, referring to its globular succulent leaves.

Distribution and status

Endemic to South Australia and known only from a few collections from the Nullarbor and the Eyre Peninsula. Native. Very rare in South Australia.
Herbarium regions: Nullarbor, Eyre Peninsula
NRM regions: Alinytjara Wilurara, Eyre Peninsula
AVH map: SA distribution map (external link)

Plant description

Minute prostrate or erect annual herb to 2 cm high. Leaves basal and on flower stems; sessile, obovoid, to 5 mm long and 3 mm wide, fleshy, reddish colour. Inflorescence short loose panicles with small white to pale-pink flowers. Flowering between September and November. Fruits are red-brown ovoid capsule to 2.5 mm long with 3-valves.ovoid, as long as the sepals or slightly longer. Seeds are shiny dark brown to red-brown reniform-ovoid seed to 0.5 mm diameter, with a tuberculate surface. Seed embryo type is peripheral.

Seed collection and propagation

Collect seeds between October and December. Collect mature capsules that are turning a red-brown colour and contain dark seeds. Place the capsules in a tray and leave to dry for one to two weeks. Then rub the capsules gently by hand to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.