Plants of
South Australia
Grevillea huegelii
Proteaceae
Comb Spider-flower
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Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion.
Least concern
Near threatened
Rare
Vulnerable
Endangered
Critically endangered
Extinct
Data deficient
Adelaide
Arkaroola
Ceduna
Coober Pedy
Hawker
Innamincka
Marla
Marree
Mount Gambier
Oodnadatta
Renmark
Wudinna
Keith
Yunta
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Botanical art

Kath Alcock paintings: 3.

Etymology

'Grevillea' after Charles F. Greville (1749-1809) a the co-founder of the Royal Horticultural Society and 'huegelii' after Baron Carl von Hugel (1795-1870) an Austrian traveller, plant collector and patron of horticulture

Distribution and status

Clay, loam or sandy soils, on flats, dunes or cliffs in sclerophyllous shrubland or woodland
Herbarium regions: North Western, Nullarbor, Gairdner-Torrens, Flinders Ranges, Eastern, Eyre Peninsula, Northern Lofty, Murray, Yorke Peninsula, Southern Lofty
NRM regions: Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, Alinytjara Wilurara, Eyre Peninsula, Northern and Yorke, South Australian Arid Lands, South Australian Murray-Darling Basin
AVH map: SA distribution map (external link)

Plant description

Prickly prostrate to spreading shrub to 2m high. Leaves rigid, pinnatisect 1.5–6 cm long, smooth and glabrous above, with 2 sericeous grooves between the recurved margin and midrib. Inflorescence a raceme, 10-12-flowered, up to 3 at the end of short branches. Perianth red to pink, 15-24 mm long. Flowering August - March. Fruits are follicle, flattened, broad-ellipsoid, glabrous, 10–12 mm long, with an obliquely inserted glabrous persistent style. Seed embryo type is straight

Seed collection and propagation

Tie collection bags around branchlets to catch mature seeds, or sieve material from underneath foliage.